Fundamentals: What is edge computing?

Screen Shot 2019 06 20 at 3.56.56 PM
It’s the weekend – time to get cozy and fire up the latest binge-worthy show on Netflix. You start up Netflix and see the dreaded loading wheel. You’re not sure how long it’ll spin – 5 seconds or 15 seconds – but it’s enough to get under your skin. This lag is actually Netflix connecting to the cloud, so it can pull up the selected show. Just about everything is connected via the cloud, but as the Internet of Things keeps growing, it puts more stress on the cloud, causing bigger latency issues. So how do we get faster speeds? Enter edge computing. What is edge computing? Simply put, it brings the computation and data storage closer to devices that need them. Typically, IoT devices rely on a central location that could be located thousands of miles away. Edge computing moves storage and servers closer to where the data is. This...

Outsight Develops a Edge Computing Device That Can Pre-processes 3D Lidar Data From Sensors Built by Different Manufacturers – FutureCar.com

Outsight Develops a Edge Computing Device That Can Pre processes 3D
author: Eric Walz    Outsight's Augmented LiDAR Box is a lidar-agnostic plug & play edge computing device. As lidar sensors for perception become an essential technology for developers of autonomous vehicles, there are dozens of companies working to improve upon the technology, including developers of more reliable solid-state lidar sensors,including those that can identify objects at longer range.However, one of the challenges for developers of autonomous vehicles that use lidar sensors for perception is pre-processing massive amounts of raw lidar sensor data so its can be used along with other perception software. There are also many different lidar sensors on the market from dozens of companies, all with different capabilities and specifications. But French photonics company Outsight has come up with a...

Quantum computing’s threat to crypto — Part 2

cryptouseratkeyboard
Work on quantum computers is accelerating as developers grow more confident that they will be able to address problems that are intractable with classical computing. That may be good news in some contexts, but bad news for cryptography. The concern is that quantum computers will crack the cryptographic schemes that protect our online lives, financial systems, and communications networks. An algorithm to do so has been around since 1994, awaiting the development of a quantum computer upon which it can run. The challenge in cryptography is to find a way in which two entities can communicate securely over a public channel. This is easy to do if the entities can meet and share a secret for use as the basis of a coding scheme. It’s more difficult if the two entities never meet, and so cannot share a secret in this way. Public key schemes address the...