Cold chips can control qubits

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Credit: Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne Researchers and engineers from QuTech in the Netherlands and from Intel Corp., jointly designed and tested a chip to control qubits that can operate at extremely low temperatures, and opens the door to solving the "wiring bottleneck," an important step toward a scalable quantum computer. Their results are published in the scientific journal Nature. Each basic unit of a quantum computer, a qubit, is typically addressed individually by a single wire. "This stands in the way of a scalable quantum computer, since millions of qubits would...

Ion Beams Create Chains of Closely Coupled Qubits

Ion Beams Qubits Diamond
Ion beams can create chains of closely coupled quantum bits (qubits) based on nitrogen-vacancy “color centers” in diamond for use in quantum computing hardware. The honeycomb pattern in the photo shows the difference between areas exposed to the beam (darker) and masked-off areas. Results indicate it should be possible to create 10,000 coupled qubits over a distance of about the width of a human hair, an unrivaled number and density of qubits. Credit: Susan Brand/Berkeley Lab) A new way to form self-aligned ‘color centers’ promises scalability to over 10,000 qubits for applications in quantum sensing and quantum computing. Achieving the immense promise of quantum computing requires new developments at every level, including the computing hardware itself.  A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab)-led international team of...

Quantum computing: Intel’s cryogenic chip shows it can control qubits even in a deep freeze

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Intel teamed up with QuTech to work on another approach to quantum control.     Image: Tim Herman / Intel Corporation Intel's quantum computing efforts are starting to show tangible results: two years after the company first unveiled its Horse Ridge cryogenic control chip, researchers have demonstrated that the technology is delivering on its original promise, and paving the way for quantum computers to become more practical. Practicality, in effect, is not quantum devices' most remarkable trait. In their current format, quantum computers rely on quantum chips that need to be cooled down to extreme temperatures, in order to exert better control over the fragile qubits on the processor. Typically, qubits operate at 20 millikelvin, or about...

Chinese team designs 62-qubit quantum processor with world’s largest number of superconducting qubits

Chinese team designs 62 qubit quantum processor with worlds largest number
Photo: WeiboA Chinese research team has successfully designed a 62-qubit programmable superconducting quantum processor, naming it Zu Chongzhi after the noted 5th century Chinese mathematician and astronomer. The computer contains the largest number of superconducting qubits so far in the world, and achieved two-dimensional programmable quantum walks on the system, a major milestone in the field. Experts said the study pushes the possibility of universal quantum computing through a two-dimensional quantum walk a big step forward.  The study was conducted by a research team from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), and was published Friday in Science magazine, one of the top academic journals in the world.The team designed and produced an 8x8 two-dimensional square superconducting qubit array composed of 62 functional qubits...

IonQ Takes Quantum Computing Public With A $2 Billion Deal

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IonQ IonQ IonQ has shattered the glass ceiling that previously separated pure-play quantum computer companies from public listed offerings. There were rumors last year that IonQ was considering an IPO. But rather than raising capital with a conventional IPO, IonQ chose to go public by using a merger with dMY Technology Group III, a SPAC (special-purpose acquisition company). The deal will create a combined entity estimated to be worth about $2 billion. A few days after the announcement, Patrick Moorhead, president of Moor Insights & Strategy, and I had an interesting conversation with Peter Chapman, CEO and President of IonQ, and Niccolo de Masi, CEO of dMY. There are hundreds of articles explaining details about the transaction and its structure. Our focus here is primarily on IonQ’s cash injection and IonQ's plans for...

Lack of symmetry in qubits can’t fix errors in quantum computing, but might explain matter/antimatter imbalance

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Newswise — LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Feb. 22, 2021—A team of quantum theorists seeking to cure a basic problem with quantum annealing computers—they have to run at a relatively slow pace to operate properly—found something intriguing instead. While probing how quantum annealers perform when operated faster than desired, the team unexpectedly discovered a new effect that may account for the imbalanced distribution of matter and antimatter in the universe and a novel approach to separating isotopes.“Although our discovery did not the cure the annealing time restriction, it brought a class of new physics problems that can now be studied with quantum annealers without requiring they be too slow,” said Nikolai Sinitsyn, a theoretical physicist at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Sinitsyn is author of the paper published Feb. 19 in Physical Review...

Quantum Computing. From test tube computers to qubits in… | by Carly Anderson | Prime Movers Lab

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From test tube computers to qubits in the cloudThere are some applications beyond breaking internet encryption that quantum computers will be good at. We know that quantum computers will be particularly simulating nature (chemistry, materials, complex physical systems). Additionally, there are optimization problems that are “classically hard but quantumly easy”, and identifying more is an active area of research.The first quantum computers that appeared in the 2000s were simply chemicals in a test tube, programmed with radiofrequency pulses (similar to an MRI scan).Since then, scientists. engineers and researchers have made qubits (quantum bits) out of many types of particles — single atoms, single ions, electrons, or photons (particles of light), and from the relationships between particles. Quantum computers based on all of these are being...