Gadgets Weekly: Microsoft Surface Laptop 4 and more

microsoft surface laptop 4 991531 1622305564
Technology companies such as  Microsoft, Sony, OnePlus BenQ, Netgear, Tecno and iTel among others launched a new smartphone, smart TV, camera microphones, smartwatch, Wi-Fi routers, and more this week (May 23-29).  DH's Gadgets Weekly edition lists the latest prominent personal technology products to keep you abreast of everything that's happening in the world of consumer electronics.Microsoft Surface Laptop 4It comes in two sizes-- 13.5-inch (2256x1504p) and 15-inch (2496 x 1664p). They sport a PixelSense 10 point multi-touch display with a pixel density of 201 ppi (pixels per inch), 3:2 aspect ratio. It features aluminium casing and metallic power and volume buttons on the keyboard. It has Alcantara material palm rest.The company offers two configuration options-- 11th Gen Intel Core i5-1135G7 quad-core processor / Quad Core 11th Intel Core...

Amazon, Microsoft, Google vie for Boeing cloud contract

161121 boeing logo
The Boeing Co., which has its corporate headquarters in Chicago, is reportedly at the center of a bidding war between Amazon, Microsoft and Google for a cloud computing contract. (Boeing Photo) Amazon, Microsoft and Google are involved in a bidding process to provide Boeing with cloud computing services, a contract that’s expected to be worth at least $1 billion over several years, The Information reports. Today’s report is attributed to four people with knowledge of the matter. We’ve reached out to Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure and Google Cloud as well as Boeing, but this is typically something such companies doesn’t talk about publicly during negotiations — as The Information found out. (For what it’s worth, representatives of Google Cloud and Microsoft sent us “no comment” emails.) The Information says AWS considers the...

6 Worst Wearable Tech Gadgets That Failed

6eed47096d5f3b1f7ffa19f122ad55f6
Nowadays, when you hear the term “wearables”, you probably think of smartwatches like the Apple Watch, fitness trackers, and VR headsets like the Oculus Rift. However, these gadgets didn’t just appear out of the ether. Several other devices had to crash and burn so modern wearables could flourish. While the 2010s was the first decade where wearables really took off, these devices actually have a long, storied history. They date all the way back to 17th century China, when scholars invented a tiny wearable abacus—or you know, the world’s first smart ring. Since then, there’s been a lot of trial and error in creating wearable technology that the average person would actually use. But we’re not here to talk about the successes. Some devices just had unlucky timing—revolutionary technologies that were simply ahead of their time. Others...

Fortanix Confidential Computing and Data Security Solutions Now Microsoft IP Co-sell Ready, Available in the Microsoft Azure Marketplace

Fortanix newlogo primary landscape 2
MOUNTAIN VIEW, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Fortanix® Inc., the data-first multi-cloud security company, today announced new and expanded security offerings available in the Microsoft Azure Marketplace, an online store providing applications and services for use on Azure. Customers can now take advantage of the productive and trusted Azure cloud platform, with streamlined deployment and management. Fortanix is also now Microsoft IP Co-sell ready. Fortanix Data Security Manager, a unified platform for protecting enterprise data across cloud and on-premises environments, is now available in Azure Marketplace for the first time. Fortanix Confidential Computing Manager, one of the first solutions for end-to-end management of secure enclaves, is now available as an Azure Managed Application. Both products are now designated as “Microsoft Preferred...

Microsoft and Apple wage war on gadget right-to-repair laws

8889be06 1411 522e 9c2b b05a67162ed6operationCROPoffset0x116resize2200x1238
By Mark Bergen Justin Millman has always fixed things. He tinkered with gadgets before opening a repair shop in Westbury, N.Y., a few blocks south of the Long Island Expressway. Students from a nearby school started trickling in with their busted devices, and business was brisk enough that Millman worked only on those. Each month he now fixes about 2,000 iPads and Chromebooks, computers that, since the pandemic, have become education essentials.Sometimes, though, Millman cannot fix them. It's not that he's technically incapable. It's that the parts and schematics are not available, usually because device manufacturers, including the world's richest companies - such as Microsoft and Google - do not share them. Several students recently came to Millman with defective WiFi cards on their Chromebooks, laptops designed only to work when connected to...

Microsoft and Apple wage war on gadget right to repair laws

1155869
Justin Millman has always fixed things. He tinkered with gadgets growing up before opening a repair shop in Westbury, New York, a few blocks south of the Long Island Expressway. Students from a nearby school started trickling in with their busted devices and business was brisk enough that Millman worked only on those. Each month he now fixes some 2,000 iPads and Chromebooks, computers that, since the pandemic, have become education essentials. Sometimes, though, Millman can’t fix them. It’s not that he’s technically incapable. It’s that the parts and schematics aren’t available, usually because device manufacturers, including the world’s richest companies – like Microsoft Corp and Alphabet Inc’s Google – don’t share them. Several students recently came to Millman with defective WiFi cards on their Chromebooks, laptops...

Microsoft and Apple Wage War on Gadget Right to Repair Laws

an inoperable chromebook wifi card at millman s repair shop photographer johnny milano bloomberg
(Bloomberg) -- Justin Millman has always fixed things. He tinkered with gadgets growing up before opening a repair shop in Westbury, New York, a few blocks south of the Long Island Expressway. Students from a nearby school started trickling in with their busted devices and business was brisk enough that Millman worked only on those. Each month he now fixes some 2,000 iPads and Chromebooks, computers that, since the pandemic, have become education essentials.Sometimes, though, Millman can’t fix them. It’s not that he’s technically incapable. It’s that the parts and schematics aren’t available, usually because device manufacturers, including the world’s richest companies—like Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google—don’t share them. Several students recently came to Millman with defective WiFi cards on their Chromebooks,...

Microsoft and Apple Wage War on Gadget Right-to-Repair Laws

1200x800
Justin Millman has always fixed things. He tinkered with gadgets growing up before opening a repair shop in Westbury, New York, a few blocks south of the Long Island Expressway. Students from a nearby school started trickling in with their busted devices and business was brisk enough that Millman worked only on those. Each month he now fixes some 2,000 iPads and Chromebooks, computers that, since the pandemic, have become education essentials.Sometimes, though, Millman can’t fix them. It’s not that he’s technically incapable. It’s that the parts and schematics aren’t available, usually because device manufacturers, including the world’s richest companies—like Microsoft Corp. and Alphabet Inc.’s Google—don’t share them. Several students recently came to Millman with defective WiFi cards on their Chromebooks, laptops designed...

France looks to Google, Microsoft for cloud technology to protect sensitive data

cloud computing 2001090 1920 1591624722241 1591624730267 1621269692016
Some of France's most sensitive state and corporate data can be safely stored using the cloud computing technology developed by Alphabet's Google and Microsoft, if it is licensed to French companies, the government said on Monday.The comment, part of strategic plan laid out by French Finance Minister Bruno Le Maire and two other ministers, acknowledges U.S. technological superiority in the field and contrasts with previous calls from European politicians for fully homegrown alternatives.Google and Microsoft, along with market leader Amazon, dominate the realm of data storage worldwide, fuelling concerns in Europe over the risk of surveillance by the United States in the wake of the adoption of the US CLOUD Act of 2018. More From This Section Read more: New AI rules could ban surveillance and scoring in the EUYet a "trustworthy" cloud...