Come Cry With Us on the ‘Gadget Lab’ 500th Episode Extravaganza

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MC: Oh, you're warming my heart over here. Well, OK. So of all the changes that you instituted to our institution, what do you think is the most lasting contribution to the podcast?DP: So the thing that I still find myself loving, and I get no credit for this, except that I like made us have the meeting that I think led to this, if I remember correctly, was the recommendations thing that, at the end, everybody's just going to say something that they love. That was your idea, I'm pretty sure, in, "How do we structure this podcast a little more, conversation?" I'm pretty sure you were the one who was like, "Let's just end with recommending stuff we like." And that's still as a listener now, it's consistently a thing that I love, and I've found books and TV shows and weird apps, and Arielle is always sending people to new places to get their...

Prime Movers Lab Webinar Series: Quantum Computing | by Carly Anderson | Prime Movers Lab | Mar, 2021

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A conversation with experts and entrepreneurs on the future of quantum computingIn this week’s episode of the Prime Movers Lab webinar series, we spoke with quantum technology expert Tatjana Curcic and two brilliant quantum entrepreneurs: Jonathan King of Atom Computing, and Jan Goetz of IQM Quantum Computers, to understand what the excitement over quantum computing is all about.[Click the link above to play the video]Dr. Tatjana Curcic has worked on quantum information technologies for decades, and is currently a DARPA Program Manager. At DARPA, she manages Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) processor development — finding useful things we can do with quantum computing technology in it’s current “noisy intermediate” state. Among her many roles and accomplishments, she managed quantum technology programs at the US Air Force Office...

Quantum Computing. From test tube computers to qubits in… | by Carly Anderson | Prime Movers Lab

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From test tube computers to qubits in the cloudThere are some applications beyond breaking internet encryption that quantum computers will be good at. We know that quantum computers will be particularly simulating nature (chemistry, materials, complex physical systems). Additionally, there are optimization problems that are “classically hard but quantumly easy”, and identifying more is an active area of research.The first quantum computers that appeared in the 2000s were simply chemicals in a test tube, programmed with radiofrequency pulses (similar to an MRI scan).Since then, scientists. engineers and researchers have made qubits (quantum bits) out of many types of particles — single atoms, single ions, electrons, or photons (particles of light), and from the relationships between particles. Quantum computers based on all of these are being...