Oxford Instruments NanoScience Gains Momentum in Quantum Computing

Oxford Instruments NanoScience ProteoxLX Image
OXFORD, England--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Oxford Instruments NanoScience is today announcing its latest innovation in Cryofree® dilution refrigerator technology for quantum computing scale-up, the ProteoxLX, as well as a new quantum computing customer collaboration in Asia. Optimised for quantum computing, the ProteoxLX is part of Oxford Instruments family of next generation dilution refrigerators which all share the same modular layout to provide cross-compatibility and added flexibility for cryogenic installations. The LX system can maximise qubit counts with its large sample space and ample coaxial wiring capacity, low vibration features for reduced noise and support of long qubit coherence times, and full integration of signal conditioning components. “NanoScience is committed to driving leadership and innovation to support the development and...

Quantum computer race intensifies as alternative technology gains steam

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An ion trap from Honeywell’s quantum computer.Credit: Honeywell Quantum Solutions A technology for building quantum computers that has long been sidelined by major companies is gaining momentum. As quantum computing has transformed from academic exercise to big business over the past decade, the spotlight has mostly been on one approach — the tiny superconducting loops embraced by technology giants such as IBM and Intel. Superconductors enabled Google last year to claim it had achieved ‘quantum advantage’ with a quantum machine that for the first time performed a particular calculation that is beyond the practical capabilities of the best classical computer. But a separate approach, using ions trapped in electric fields, is gaining traction in the quest to make a commercial quantum computer.Earlier this year, technology and...