How Quantum Computing Will Help Solve Real-World Problems Much Faster

quantum computer research 60b0a0841efa9
Over the past couple of years, there has been a significant interest in Quantum Computing. It is one of the fast-emerging disruptive technology that can significantly impact many industries and societies. BCG estimates that quantum computing will touch $2-$5 billion by 2024, reaching $50 billion by the end of the decade. The technology is already witnessing exponential growth in its computing power as measured in "Quantum Volume" and is expected to grow further. The "quantum advantage" is likely to be realized in the next few years where real-world problems of consequence can be solved efficiently using a quantum computer that even the most giant supercomputer will not be able to achieve.  IBMPotential applications span multiple sectors including finance, healthcare, manufacturing to supply-chain and logistics. For...

IBM just solved this quantum computing problem 120 times faster than previously possible

1621409636 quantum computing1 niplot
Using a combination of tweaked algorithms, improved control systems and a new quantum service called Qiskit Runtime, IBM researchers have managed to resolve a quantum problem 120 times faster than the previous time they gave it a go. Back in 2017, Big Blue announced that, equipped with a seven-qubit quantum processor, its researchers had successfully simulated the behavior of a small molecule called lithium hydride (LiH). At the time, the operation took 45 days. Now, four years later, the IBM Quantum team has announced that the same problem was solved in only nine hours.  The simulation was run entirely on the cloud, through IBM's Qiskit platform – an open-source library of tools that lets developers around the world create quantum programs and run them on prototype quantum devices that IBM makes available over the...

IBM unveils 2-nanometre chip technology for faster computing, Technology News

194166 untitled design 42
For decades, each generation of computer chips got faster and more power-efficient because their most basic building blocks, called transistors, got smaller. The pace of those improvements has slowed, but International Business Machines Corp on Thursday said that silicon has at least one more generational advance in store. IBM introduced what it says is the world's first 2-nanomere chipmaking technology. The technology could be as much as 45% faster than the mainstream 7-nanometre chips in many of today's laptops and phones and up to 75% more power efficient, the company said. Also read: Scientists fuse nature with tech as 'robo-plants' surge The technology likely will take several years to come to market. Once a major manufacturer of chips, IBM now outsources its high-volume chip production to Samsung Electronics Co Ltd but...

IBM unveils 2 nanometre chip tech for faster computing

IBM ians vewiSKhedjcdd
Bengaluru: Tech giant IBM on Thursday unveiled the world's first 2-nanonmetre (nm) chipmaking technology.It is projected to achieve 45 per cent higher performance, or 75 per cent lower energy use, than today's most advanced 7 nm node chips.The company's new 2 nm chip technology helps advance the state-of-the-art in the semiconductor industry, addressing this growing demand."The IBM innovation reflected in this new 2 nm chip is essential to the entire semiconductor and IT industry," Dario Gil, SVP and Director of IBM Research, said in a statement."It is the product of IBM's approach of taking on hard tech challenges and a demonstration of how breakthroughs can result from sustained investments and a collaborative R&D ecosystem approach," Gil added.The potential benefits of these advanced 2 nm chips could include quadrupling cell phone battery...

Quantum computing could be useful faster than anyone expected

gettyimages 1294978201
New quantum algorithms could significantly boost the efficiency of some critical financial operations on hardware that might be available in only five years' time.    Image: Teradat Santivivut / Moment / Getty Images For most scientists, a quantum computer that can solve large-scale business problems is still a prospect that belongs to the distant future, and one that won't be realized for at least another decade. But now researchers from US banking giant Goldman Sachs and quantum computing company QC Ware have designed new quantum algorithms that they say could significantly boost the efficiency of some critical financial operations – on hardware that might be available in only five years' time.  Rather than waiting for a...

Edge computing may hold the key to a faster, cheaper, more sustainable internet

edmonton downtown core aerials
Most of the time, storing data in the cloud—whether that's our own personal photos, or Netflix's stockpile of videos—gives us what feels like instant access to digital information. But a developing approach promises a faster, more environmentally sustainable means to managing our ever expanding digital data.  Blesson Varghese is a senior lecturer and Principal Investigator at the Edge Computing Hub at Queen's University Belfast. He explains that with edge computing, some services of an application are not processed in the cloud, but on the "edge of the network," which could mean, say, your home router, or small, dispersed "micro-data centres", or even on the device itself. Varghese spoke with Spark host Nora Young about the future of edge computing, and the role it can play in the Internet of Things. Here is part of their conversation. ...

IBM promises 100x faster quantum computers through new software foundations

20180405 ibm q quantum computer 03
In this IBM quantum computer, the processor is in the canister at the bottom. Stephen Shankland/CNET IBM unveiled on Wednesday improvements to quantum computing software that it expects will increase performance of its complex machines by a factor of 100, a development that builds on Big Blue's progress in making the advanced computing hardware.In a road map, the computing giant targeted the release of quantum computing applications over the next two years that will tackle challenges such as artificial intelligence and complex financial calculations. And it's opening up lower level programming access that it expects will lead to a better foundation for...