Microsoft details critical vulnerability in ChromeOS • The Register

Microsoft details critical vulnerability in ChromeOS • The Register
Microsoft has described a severe ChromeOS security vulnerability that one of its researchers reported to Google in late April. The bug was promptly fixed and, about a month later, merged in ChromeOS code then released on June 15, 2022 and detailed by Redmond in a report released on Friday. Microsoft's write-up is noteworthy both for the severity (9.8 out of 10) of the bug and for flipping of the script – it has tended to be Google, particularly its Project Zero group, that calls attention to bugs in Microsoft software. At least as far back as 2010, Google security researchers made a habit of disclosing bugs in software from Microsoft and other vendors after typically 90 days – even if a patch had not been released – in the interest of forcing companies to respond to...

Q&A With David Egts of Red Hat Details Edge Computing Importance, Addressing Challenges and Hybrid Cloud Approach

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David Egts Red HatDavid Egts, senior director and chief technologist of Red Hat's North American public sector, recently took part in a recent Q&A session with ExecutiveBiz to detail the ongoing importance of edge computing and its capabilities in data processing.  During the Q&A session, Egts also discussed the changes in the federal workforce as our sector continues to adjust to telework as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the use of edge devices, the benefits and challenges of maintaining the connectivity for the internet of things (IoT), the positive influence of flexible tech infrastructure and more.  You can read the full Q&A session with David Egts below: ExecutiveBiz: Following the COVID-19 pandemic’s impact on federal agencies and the federal workforce’s telework capabilities, what has changed since we last spoke about...

Honeywell Just Released Details About How Its Quantum Computer Works

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Engineering giant Honeywell burst into the quantum computing race out of left field last year. Now the company has provided the first concrete details of how its device works in a peer-reviewed journal. Unlike its main rivals Google and IBM, who rely on superconducting qubits, Honeywell is using trapped ions to power its device. The technology has a long pedigree—most of the earliest quantum computing experiments relied on this approach—but difficulties in scaling devices beyond a few qubits saw it eclipsed by alternatives. The technique relies on encoding information in the quantum states of charged particles called ions, which are suspended in a vacuum using electromagnetic fields. These qubits have a number of advantages over their superconducting cousins: they maintain their quantum states far longer, they’re less error-prone, and they...