Quantum computing’s imminent arrival in Cleveland could be a back-to-the-future moment: Thomas Bier

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CLEVELAND -- The Cleveland Clinic’s partnership with IBM to use quantum computing for medical research brings to mind the most unfortunate instance of bad timing in the history of Cleveland: the 1967 merger of Case Institute of Technology with Western Reserve University just when the computer age was coming to life.The merger squelched Case’s opportunity to be among the leaders in the most revolutionary technology ever (and to benefit Cleveland with computer-related jobs). Might the arrival of quantum computing mean fresh opportunity?At the time of the merger, Case’s Department of Computer Engineering and Science had a good chance to be at the forefront. But capitalizing on that required support from senior administrators of the new Case Western Reserve University — administrators who could not be focused on technology to the degree that...

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 8.4 arrives and take Linux to computing’s edge

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Arpit Joshipura, The Linux Foundation's general manager of networking, once said "edge computing will overtake cloud computing" by 2025. By edge computing, Joshipura meant open compute and storage resources that are five to 20 milliseconds away. That used to be common. They were the computers in our server room. Now, we often rely on cloud computing instead. But, Red Hat, primarily a hybrid-cloud company now, is reminding us that its latest version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) is also great for your local and edge servers.  They have reason to remind IT leaders of this. A recent Linux Foundation study, 2021 State of the Edge, predicts that by 2025, between the Internet-of-Things (IoT) and edge-related devices we'll need to deal with about 90 zettabytes of data. That's a heck of a lot of data! To...

Quantum computing’s reproducibility crisis: Majorana fermions

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Experiments to find Majorana signals are performed by loading a nanowire into a dilution refrigerator capable of cooling it down to close to absolute zero.Credit: HGA Architects and Engineers A shadow has fallen over the race to detect a new type of quantum particle, the Majorana fermion, that could power quantum computers. As someone who works in this area, I’ve become concerned that, after a series of false starts, a significant fraction of the Majorana field is fooling itself. Several key experiments claiming to have detected Majorana particles, initially considered as breakthroughs, have not been confirmed. One recent case ended in a high-profile retraction from Nature (see Nature 591, 354–355; 2021), which I initiated with my colleague Vincent Mourik, a physicist at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. We raised...

Quantum computing’s threat to crypto — Part 2

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Work on quantum computers is accelerating as developers grow more confident that they will be able to address problems that are intractable with classical computing. That may be good news in some contexts, but bad news for cryptography. The concern is that quantum computers will crack the cryptographic schemes that protect our online lives, financial systems, and communications networks. An algorithm to do so has been around since 1994, awaiting the development of a quantum computer upon which it can run. The challenge in cryptography is to find a way in which two entities can communicate securely over a public channel. This is easy to do if the entities can meet and share a secret for use as the basis of a coding scheme. It’s more difficult if the two entities never meet, and so cannot share a secret in this way. Public key schemes address the...

Assessing Cloud Computing’s Value | Automation World

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Few people in industry today haven't yet been inundated with information about the use of cloud and edge computing for collecting and analyzing the massive amounts of data generated by industrial equipment. And though cloud computing was the main focus for these applications several years ago, over the past few years, edge computing has garnered an increasing share of the discussion. The reason for this stems largely from edge computing’s advantages of keeping data on site and not having to worry about the bandwidth and cost concerns generated by transmitting and storing those massive amounts of equipment data in the cloud. Despite these benefits, cloud computing will still have a big role to play in industry's future, and not just for the biggest companies. To learn more about this, we connected with Brian Fenn, chief operating...